NC State
BioResources
  • Reviewpp 8770-8794Radics, R., Dasmohapatra, S., and Kelley, S. S. (2015). "Systematic review of bioenergy perception studies," BioRes. 10(4), 8770-8794.AbstractArticlePDF

    This paper presents the results of a structured review of published articles that discuss stakeholders’ perceptions of bioenergy, including both biofuels and biopower. An electronic search process using numerous key terms identified 44 peer-reviewed publications from 2000 to 2013 that focused on stakeholders’ perceptions, understanding, and acceptance of bioenergy. These findings indicate that in the last decade the research community has been more active in publications focused on the societal and public perceptions of the bioenergy industry compared to prior years. Among the reviewed studies, most (84%) are based in the US and Europe, and only a few recent studies have focused on stakeholders in Asia and other parts of the world. This review revealed no standardized methods for evaluation of stakeholder perception, for data collection, or statistical analysis of the data. Among stakeholder groups, the majority of studies focused on the general public or the consumer’s opinion about bioenergy (79% of studies). Overall findings show that the stakeholder groups show low to moderate support for the bioenergy industry. As anticipated, the stakeholder groups had varied views about the opportunities and risks associated with bioenergy industry, and these views varied based on their experiences.

  • Reviewpp 8795-8811Kerekes, R. J. (2015). "Perspectives on high and low consistency refining in mechanical pulp," BioRes. 10(4), 8795-8811.AbstractArticlePDF

    Recent developments in low consistency refining in mechanical pulping have raised questions about the differences between low and high consistency refining. This paper, originally presented to the UBC Energy Reduction in Mechanical Pulping Committee on 10 June 2015 at the PACWEST Conference in Whistler, BC, Canada, discusses the author’s perspectives on these issues as well as on mechanical pulping in general.

  • Reviewpp 8812-8858Eseyin, A. E., Steele, P. H., and Pittman Jr., C. U. (2015). "Current trends in the production and applications of torrefied wood/biomass - A review," BioRes. 10(4), 8812-8858.AbstractArticlePDF

    Trends in the production and applications of torrefied wood/biomass are reviewed in this article. The thermochemical conversion of biomass is a promising technology because biomass is an environmentally friendly fuel that produces substantially lower CO2 emissions compared to fossil fuel. Torrefaction is the thermal treatment of biomass at temperatures from 200 to 300 ˚C in the absence of air or oxygen to liberate water and release volatile organic compounds, primarily through the decomposition of the hemicelluloses. Torrefied biomass has a higher heating value, is more hydrophobic, resists rotting, and has a prolonged storage time. The different torrefaction technologies and reactors are described. An overview of the applications of torrefied biomass, the economic status, and future prospects of torrefaction technology are presented and discussed. Currently, torrefaction demonstration plants have technical problems that have delayed their commercial operation. Torrefaction reactors still require optimization to economically meet end-use requirements and attain product standardization for the market. Several characteristics of torrefaction need to be demonstrated or scaled up for successful commercialization.